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Message from John


The Environment and You

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Message from John


The Environment and You

John Aldag  Member of Parliament | Cloverdale - Langley City Chair | Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development

John Aldag
Member of Parliament | Cloverdale - Langley City
Chair | Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development

Cloverdale - Langley City friends and neighbours,

In 2015, our government was elected to address the critical and urgent need to take action on climate change. As a result, the government, in consultation with the provinces, territories, and Indigenous peoples, adopted the Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. From there, we implemented a historic national plan to combat climate change, in addition to investing 1.3 Billion dollars for nature conservation and protection.

Over the past two years, our government has worked on creating a clean environment for future generations and protecting Canada’s nature, parks, and wild spaces. We have taken action by implementing carbon pricing in areas without a price on pollution, promoting responsible resource development during the transition to green energy, phasing-out coal, protecting our oceans, and making massive investments in green infrastructure, electric vehicles and public transit, as well as research and innovation.

In 2015, I was asked to sit on the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, and have chaired this committee since last September. Over the past four years, we studied environmental issues such as climate change, plastic pollution, energy- efficient buildings, and protected areas. Our work can be found online, here.

We must recognize that everyone has to take part in fighting climate change for our efforts to succeed. We cannot back down from this challenge, because there are no other options. An Abenaki saying puts it perfectly, “When the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.”

For our children, for the 1 million species at risk of extinction, for the future of our planet, tackling climate change is by far our generation’s largest challenge. I am sure that together we will rise to this challenge!

Sincerely,

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John Aldag
Member of Parliament | Cloverdale - Langley City

About Climate Change


What is Climate Change?

About Climate Change


What is Climate Change?

Climate change is arguably the most pressing issue facing us — it affects our health, economy, ecosystems and more. Canada’s natural heritage is part of our national identity. From the shores of BC to the shores of Newfoundland, we have some of the most spectacular geography and wildlife on Planet Earth.

According to a UN report on loss of biodiversity, 1 million species are facing extinction across the world, over 500 of them in Canada. Extreme weather events are also continuing to increase in frequency and intensity.

There is good news; the government is taking action, and so can you! It’s not too late.

A joint effort for sustainability between policymakers and the Canadian people is a realistic action that must be taken. Within this guide, the government’s action is presented in more detail along with suggestions for easy lifestyle alterations citizens can make to save money while living more sustainably.

If not now, when? If not us, whom? We can do it and that is exactly what we will do.
— Justin Trudeau (October 23, 2018)

The Time is Now


The Time is Now

The Time is Now


The Time is Now

According to the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, the next two to three years will be crucial for tackling climate change, as the policies adopted and the investments made during this time will determine what our emissions will be for the next decade.

International Consensus

About 97% of actively publishing scientists agree that climate change is caused by human carbon emissions. Additionally, some 40 countries have already implemented some kind of carbon pricing system as the cornerstone of their climate action plans.

 
 

Strong Foundation

Economists and scientists across the board agree that pricing pollution is the most logical foundation for an effective climate plan to reduce

greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, carbon pricing alone isn’t going to achieve the ambitious goals we must set to avoid a climate crisis. The government has laid out an extensive plan to ensure future Canadians will be able to enjoy our natural heritage.

Last year, I had the honour of putting forward a resolution on carbon pricing as part of the Canadian delegation to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE PA). The OSCE PA is comprised of 56 parliaments with the goal of advancing comprehensive security through interparliamentary dialogue. Climate change is one of the world’s largest security threats, and I am truly honoured to have represented Canada at the OSCE PA and to have put forward this resolution.

 
The next two to three years will be crucial.
— Alain Webster
 

Pan-Canadian Framework on Climate Change


Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change

Pan-Canadian Framework on Climate Change


Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change

There are four main pillars of the government’s plan to address climate change.

This plan has a number of measures including, but not limited to, expanding public transit, reducing plastic waste, investing in renewable energy, doubling the number of protected areas, eliminating coal, building adaptive infrastructure, and protecting our oceans and bodies of fresh water.

Further, I have had the honour of serving on the Environment and Sustainable Development Committee since 2016 where we have studied issues ranging from plastic pollution to forestry, agriculture and waste.

Click here to learn more about our work, please visit

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Price on Pollution


Putting a Price on Pollution

Price on Pollution


Putting a Price on Pollution

It’s no longer free to pollute in Canada.

Leading economists agree that pricing pollution is one of the most effective ways of addressing climate change. British Columbia was the first region in Canada to price pollution in 2008. With this pollution pricing, British Columbians lowered carbon emissions per capita, while also having a stable and growing economy, proving that pricing pollution is an effective policy tool to reduce emissions and grow the economy.

In light of this economic evidence and the success found in BC, putting a price on pollution is the cornerstone of Canada’s action plan to combat climate change. The goal is to encourage businesses and individuals to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions. Pricing pollution is achieved through a tax, like in British Columbia since 2008, or through a cap and trade system, as in Quebec since 2014.

The results are clear and provide two benefits. Polluting is no longer free, and polluters— businesses or individuals— change their behaviour and reduce their carbon footprint.

The federal government set a deadline of December 2018 for provinces without a climate plan to choose how they would implement carbon pricing. Effective April 1, 2019, Canada now has a carbon floor price of $20 per tonne, which will gradually increase until 2050. Given BC’s leadership, the federal backstop may never apply in BC.

Putting a price on pollution will not solve climate change alone, but it is an important part of a robust plan to address climate change.

Phasing Out Coal-Fired Electricity


Phasing Out Coal-Fired Electricity

Phasing Out Coal-Fired Electricity


Phasing Out Coal-Fired Electricity

Goodbye Coal

Making a transition to cleaner energy helps cut carbon pollution and aids in our transition to clean energy and climate action. Phasing out coal also reduces our exposure to harmful air pollutants from coal plants, and protects our health by improving the quality of the air we breathe.

Canada’s electricity generationmix is already one of thecleanest in the world; however, 10% of all power generated still comes from coal. By phasing out coal-fired electricity early, Canada strives to have 90 percent of electricity from non-emitting sources by 2030and will cut carbon pollutionfrom the electricity sector by 12.8 million tonnes.

 
 

Aiding Those in the Coal Industry

As we phase out coal-fired electricity in order to protect Canadians health and the environment, our government knows this may cause job losses for some workers. In 2018, the Task Force on Just Transition for Canadian Coal Power Workers and Communities was created to find ways to support those affected by the transition to a clean-growth economy.

The Task Force recommended that the government take the following considerations:

  • Create worker transition centres.

    to offer skills development initiatives and economic and community diversification activities in Western and Eastern Canada

  • Explore new ways to protect wages and pensions.

  • Create a $150 million infrastructure fund to support priority projects and economic diversification in impacted communities.

Reducing Plastic Pollution


Reducing Plastic Pollution

Reducing Plastic Pollution


Reducing Plastic Pollution

The production and use of plastics have skyrocketed in recent decades. Accordingly, so has the amount of plastic entering the oceans. Millions of metric tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year which affects all kinds of wildlife. This is equivalent to 1 dump truck per minute!

If things continue as is, by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the ocean.
— Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Thankfully, there’s something each and every one of us can do to reduce our current impact. Use less single-use plastic!

As Chair of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, I have listened to hours of testimony from scientists and policy experts alike.

Thankfully, there’s something each and every one of us can do to reduce our current impact. Use less single-use plastic!

As Chair of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, I have listened to hours of testimony from scientists and policy experts alike.

Thankfully, there’s something each and every one of us can do to reduce our current impact. Use less single-use plastic!

As Chair of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, I have listened to hours of testimony from scientists and policy experts alike.

Thankfully, there’s something each and every one of us can do to reduce our current impact. Use less single-use plastic!

As Chair of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, I have listened to hours of testimony from scientists and policy experts alike.

Thankfully, there’s something each and every one of us can do to reduce our current impact. Use less single-use plastic!

As Chair of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, I have listened to hours of testimony from scientists and policy experts alike.

Thankfully, there’s something each and every one of us can do to reduce our current impact. Use less single-use plastic!

As Chair of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, I have listened to hours of testimony from scientists and policy experts alike.

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Investing in Cloverdale - Langley City Transit


Investing in Cloverdale - Langley City Transit

Investing in Cloverdale - Langley City Transit


Investing in Cloverdale - Langley City Transit

Our federal government acknowledges that Metro Vancouver is home to some of the fastest growing cities in Canada. In 2018, an investment of more than $3 billion was announced for two major rapid transit projects in our region, including $1.65 billion for a South of the Fraser transit line.

Another commitment to transit is a $1.47 billion investment to increase the capacity of the SkyTrain fleet and support operational and system upgrades along the Expo and Millennium Lines to serve our rapidly growing ridership. This will increase capacity and reduce overcrowding across Metro Vancouver’s Transit System.

The funds will be used to purchase approximately 200 new SkyTrain cars to replace 150 original cars, which are near the end of their lifecycle and will increase SkyTrain capacity by over 5,000 passengers at peak times.

Surrey and the Langleys will also be receiving an additional top-up of approximately $2.041 million through the federal Gas Tax Fund. Our government is making sure municipalities receive additional funds to address short-term infrastructure projects. This top-up has been allocated to TransLink to contribute to upgrading our transit.

 
 

Zero-Emission Vehicle Strategy


Zero-Emission Vehicle Strategy

Zero-Emission Vehicle Strategy


Zero-Emission Vehicle Strategy

Investment

The federal Government is taking action to help more Canadians choose zero-emission vehicles, which will allow Canada to transition to a low carbon economy and reduce transportation costs for the middle class.

Our Government is aiming to foster increased investment in Canada’s domestic auto industry, so that it can become a global leader in zero-emission transportation manufacturing.

 
 

Affordability

In Budget 2019, our government is:

  1. Expanding the network of zero-emission vehicle charging and refilling stations.

  2. Investing $5 million over 5 years to Transport Canada for auto manufacturers to secure voluntary zero-emission vehicle sales targets to ensure vehicle supply meets demand.

  3. Encouraging more Canadians to buy zero-emission vehicles through a new federal incentive of up to $5,000.

  4. Attracting and supporting job-creating investments in zero-emission vehicle manufacturing in Canada.

Did you know? Businesses are eligible for a full tax write-off in the year they put their zero-emission vehicles to use.

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Trans-Mountain Pipeline


Trans-Mountain Pipeline (TMX)

Trans-Mountain Pipeline


Trans-Mountain Pipeline (TMX)

Part of the transition

Why did the government buy a pipeline when we have pledged to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2030? While our government recognizes that the Trans Mountain Pipeline isn’t a direct investment in the future, it is still a necessary step in our transition to green energy.

Canada’s current economy is still heavily dependent on oil and we are dedicated to using our natural petroleum resources responsibly. As we strive to follow the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, it is important to continue to grow and protect jobs for Canadians.

During this period of transition, we need to diversify our oil markets. As of now, 99% of our energy resources go to the United States. This needs to be changed, as currently, we are selling to the United States at a deep discount, which is hindering the growth and production of our economy. It is estimated that we are losing $17 billion every year by selling only to the US.

The Trans Mountain Expansionhas 157 legally binding conditionsto protect the environment, while ensuring the fast and safe transportation of oil. We have ensured that the pipeline fits within our national climate strategy and meets our strict environmental and social standards.

On June 18, our government approved the TMX expansion. To help with our transition to a clean economy, we will use the earnings from this pipeline to fund a cleanenergy transition. Every dollar thefederal government earns from this project will be invested to help fund things like electrification projects, investments in renewable resources, and efforts to transition Indigenous communities off diesel-power. Additional corporate tax revenue alone could be around $500 million per year once the project is up and running.

 
 

Oceans Protection Plan


Oceans Protection Plan

Oceans Protection Plan


Oceans Protection Plan

Canada has the longest coastline in the world. Our coasts support traditional Indigenous and coastal community livelihoods, attract tourism, and enable the export and import of our goods overseas.

Our action plan will protect our coasts so that they remain healthy, clean, and safe for generations to come. Here’s how the $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan will support coastal communities:

  1. Creating a world-leading marine safety system that improves responsible shipping, protects Canada’s waters, and strengthens response measures;

  2. Restoring and protecting marine ecosystems and natural habitats;

  3. Strengthening partnerships and launching co-management practices with Indigenous and coastal communities; and

  4. Investing in oil spill clean-up methods and research.

 
 

Whale Action Plan

Over the past two years, our government has taken action to protect and recover the endangered Southern Resident Killer Whale population.

By investing $170M in our Whale Action Plan, we are protecting Killer Whales and attempting to increase their population.

So far, we have been testing the effectiveness of vessel noise reduction efforts, to minimize or eliminate noises that disrupt whales and other marine life.

How to Help


What Can You Do To Help?

How to Help


What Can You Do To Help?

 Transportation

  • Cut back on your KMs

  • Be efficient in using your car

  • Walk whenever possible

  • Bike

  • Car-pool

  • Consider public transit

New Habits

  • Reduce consumption

  • Reuse when possible

  • Compost food scraps

Be Energy Smart!

Are you going out or going to bed?

  • Turn off all your devices

  • Turn down the heat by 3°C

  • Turn off the outside lights At Home?

  • Use the dryer less

  • Use LED lights

Use Less Plastic!

  • Stop using disposable plastic water bottles

  • Refuse plastic bags

  • Forgot to bring your own bag? Ask for paper.

  • Don’t buy plastic wrap

  • Avoid single-use straws, containers, cups, bowls and utensils, or ask for compostable ones

  • Recycle the plastic you use

At the Store

  • Buy and eat local

  • Look for fruit and vegetables that are in season

  • Freeze in-season foods and use them in the winter

  • Ask for paper bags for unpackaged fruit and vegetables

  • Don’t waste food

  • Consume vegan (plant-based) dishes